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Meet our Newest Research Assistant

Tue Jun 01 2021 02:32:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

Meet our research assistant who have recently joined OFI Module I and our partner Too Big To Ignore. This month we feature Ryan Command

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Reflections from the Ocean Visions Summit

Tue Jun 01 2021 02:31:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

During the Ocean Visions Summit 2021, a key theme was that actions to sustain lives and livelihoods in small-scale fisheries are essential to fisheries and ocean governance. Too often, data is collected, analyzed, and disseminated without any benefit returning to the communities in which it was collected. In order to move toward an equitable and global ecosystem for ocean solutions, local communities need to be included in the process - from design to final product. This requires co-development of policy, management, and research, co-creation of knowledge, and co-delivery of products that improve human health and wellbeing. Taking a citizen science approach and forming meaningful collaborations is essential to develop knowledge about, with, and for small-scale fisheries. Here, we highlight some of the projects presented at the Ocean Visions Summit that may be helpful in Getting Transdisciplinarity Right!

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Highlights from Canada's UN Ocean Science Decade workshop

Tue Jun 01 2021 02:31:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

The United Nations declared 2021-2030 as the Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development, with the overarching mission to connect people and the ocean to facilitate the transition from the ocean we have, to the ocean we want. The UN has outlined seven priority areas for the Decade: a clean ocean, a healthy and resilient ocean, a productive and sustainable ocean, a predicted ocean, a safe ocean, an accessible ocean, and an inspiring and engaging ocean. Canada hosted a workshop that invited stakeholders and rightsholders to discuss a Canadian blueprint for the Decade



In this story, we present a summary of the workshop related to the priority areas, reflecting on the role of governance and small-scale fisheries in Canada's Ocean Science Decade priorities.

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World Ocean's Week Pop-Up

Tue Jun 01 2021 02:30:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

The first week of June is World Ocean's Week! This is an extra special WOW as 2021 marks the beginning of the United Nations Decade of Ocean Science and Sustainable Development.

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In Focus: June's World Ocean's Day Celebration

Tue Jun 01 2021 02:30:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

This newsletter highlights June 8th’s World Oceans Day celebrations. We are all connected to some extent through the global ocean. The ocean covers more than 70% of the Earth’s surface and provides between 50-80% of the oxygen in the atmosphere, supporting most of life as we know it. It has also been protecting us from the worst impacts of climate change, absorbing about 30% of the carbon dioxide we have produced in the past 200 years and more than 90% of the excess heat. This buffering comes at a cost, with unprecedented ocean warming and acidification, sea-level rise, and biodiversity loss jeopardizing the health and well-being of coastal communities and the sustainability of fisheries on which millions of people depend.

This year’s World Oceans Day theme is The Ocean: Life & Livelihoods. Indeed, more than 3 billion people rely on the ocean for their livelihood – as a means to secure the necessities for life and to ensure the survival of cultural practices and values in coastal communities. Coastal fisheries shape and are shaped by the cultures and economies of coastal areas and are crucial for lives and livelihoods. It is therefore important to take stock of lives and livelihoods in coastal fisheries and fishing communities. Communities, industries, governments, and researchers can then understand what they need to get right to support coastal fisheries now and well into the future.

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Bright Young Faces

Sat May 01 2021 03:01:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

Meet our Research Assistants who have recently completed their work term with OFI Module I and our partner Too Big To Ignore.

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Marine Safety In Focus

Sat May 01 2021 03:00:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

Spring is an exciting time for fish harvesters. Some groundfish and shellfish harvesters are ramping up their effort following the April start, while others eagerly await opening dates in May and beyond. As many small-boat harvesters are heading back onto the water, it is a good time to draw attention to important discussions and research on safety on the Atlantic coast. Fish harvesters face a range of occupational hardships and risks. Working conditions are highly varied, and often hazardous. Tied to the nature of work is the importance for workers to sustain maritime industries and their benefits to coastal communities and the broader Canadian society. All these concerns beg the question: What makes a fishery safe for fishers?

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MARINE SAFETY POP-UP

Sat May 01 2021 02:30:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

The Marine Safety Pop Up is a sneak-peek into the diverse and interdisciplinary world of OFI research. This month we are showcasing two research projects that involve OFI researchers and collaborators.

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The Robin Rigby Trust Call for Proposals 2021: Collaborative Coastal Research

Fri Apr 23 2021 17:00:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

The Robin Rigby Trust was established in 2007 in memory of Patricia Robin Rigby. The fund supports coastal and nearshore conservation research conducted by young people, and encourages international collaboration. The fund is seeking proposals for projects focused on environmental and resource management, social and economic development, conservation and biodiversity surveys, and policy studies, with a specific emphasis on improving livelihoods of those living in coastal communities. Projects should be designed to produce direct benefits to communities, and establish strong collaborative links between applicant and community partners.

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Earth Day In Focus

Thu Apr 01 2021 02:32:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

Earth Day is a day to draw attention to the state of the Earth and foster awareness and support for environmental protection. Earth Day helps us recognize the impact that all human activity has on changes in our climate and ecosystems, including the oceans. It is also an opportunity to take stock and remember how much we depend on our oceans, from local to global scales. This day reminds us that marine life and ecosystems need to be protected in light of drivers of change such as climate change. In short, Earth Day is a call for environmental sustainability of fisheries and oceans – an opportunity for us to step up and act as stewards of these resources, making sure they are there for both the current and future generations.

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EARTH DAY POP-UP

Thu Apr 01 2021 02:31:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

An Earth Day Pop Up is a sneak-peek into the diverse and interdisciplinary world of OFI research. This month we are showcasing five research studies that involve OFI researchers and collaborators.

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New paper offers a principled governance of seafood trade policy as a just way forward for fisheries in Newfoundland and Labrador

Wed Mar 31 2021 02:30:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

Former TBTI and OFI Master of Arts in Geography student Jack Daly and OFI Module I Lead Ratana Chuenpagdee published a recent article in Ocean & Coastal Management on their research into trade policy and its effect on Newfoundland and Labradors fisheries. Daly and Chuenpagdee’s article, titled "Community Responses to International Trade Policy: a Newfoundland Case Study,” presents the results from interviews and policy analysis that took place on the Great Northern Peninsula in Newfoundland and Labrador during the summer of 2018.

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New Paper: Coastal Fishers Livelihood Behaviors and Their Psychosocial Explanations: Implications for Fisheries Governance in a Changing World

Tue Mar 30 2021 02:30:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

This research, led by OFI postdoctoral research fellow Evan Andrews, is a critical examination of the behavioral foundations of livelihood pathways over a 50-year time period in a multispecies fishery in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. This analysis draws on 26 narrative interviews with fishers who have pursued two or more fish species currently or formerly. Research findings emphasize the need for scientists, policy-makers, and managers to incorporate psychosocial evidence along with social science about fisher behavior into their models, policy processes, and management approaches.

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Submit a session for the 'Small-Scale Fisheries Open House’ at the 2021 World Ocean Week

Mon Mar 29 2021 02:30:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

This June OFI, together with TBTI Global and a number of other international organizations, is once again celebrating the World Ocean Week (WOW). As part of our ‘Small-Scale Fisheries Open House’ event, we’re inviting groups, organizations or networks that represent or work with small-scale fishing communities to organize a session. The session can cover any small-scale fishery topic in a country, countries, or in a region, as long as it is situated within the broad context of 'Life an livelihoods', the official theme of the 2021 WOW. The open house will also help shape two major events next year, the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries and Aquaculture in 2022 and the 4th World Small-Scale Fisheries Congress.

The format is flexible. It can be a mixture of live and pre-recorded presentations. It can include any combination of interviews, discussions, panels, video-clips, performances, arts, music or any other ideas. Your show can be either 30, 60, 90 or 120 minutes. Send a short synopsis of your ideas (about 100 words) to tbti.global@gmail.com, and we’ll work with you to make it happen.

The number of session slots is limited so we strongly encourage you to submit the expression of interests before April 15.

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'Thinking Big About Small-Scale Fisheries in Canada' - Call for Contributions - Submission Date Updated

Sun Mar 28 2021 02:30:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

The e-book 'Thinking Big About Small-Scale Fisheries in Canada' edited by Dr. Evan Andrews, Jack Daly and Dr. Christine Knott calls for research and perspectives on small-scale fisheries in Canada. The editors are seeking contributions in the form of written essays and stories (up to 4,000 words) with visual images, videos, and/or audio recordings that describe challenging changes and opportunities to address and anticipate change in local governance. Topics of the essays and stories can include economic, social and cultural contributions of Canadian small-scale fisheries to communities and economies at the local, national and global level. The editors are also interested in historical or recent policies and institutions changes, which may have shifted and shaped small-scale fisheries in Canada. Finally, they welcome contribution about efforts, strategies, and local governance taken by all actors to address these changes. Submit an expression of interest as an e-mail attachment to evana@mun.ca by April 9th, 2021.

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Coastal Fishers Livelihood Behaviors and Their Psychosocial Explanations: Implications for Fisheries Governance in a Changing World

Sat Mar 27 2021 02:30:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

This research is a critical examination of the behavioral foundations of livelihood pathways over a 50-year time period in a multispecies fishery in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. Fishers make difficult decisions to pursue, enjoy, and protect their livelihoods in times of change and uncertainty, and the resultant behaviors shape efforts to advance sustainability through coastal and marine fisheries governance. However, there is limited evidence about fishers’ behavioral changes over long time periods, and the psychosocial experiences that underpin them, beyond what is assumed using neoclassical economic and rational choice framings. Our analysis draws on 26 narrative interviews with fishers who have pursued two or more fish species currently or formerly. Fishers were asked about their behavioral responses to change and uncertainty in coastal fisheries across their entire lifetimes. Their narratives highlighted emotional, perceptual, and values-oriented factors that shaped how fishers coped and adapted to change and uncertainty. The contributions to theory and practice are two-fold. First, findings included variation in patterns of fisher behaviors. Those patterns reflected fishers prioritizing and trading-off material or relational well-being. With policy relevance, prioritizations and trade-offs of forms of well-being led to unexpected outcomes for shifting capacity and capitalization for fishers and in fisheries more broadly. Second, findings identified the influence of emotions as forms of subjective well-being. Further, emotions and perceptions functioned as explanatory factors that shaped well-being priorities and trade-offs, and ultimately, behavioral change. Research findings emphasize the need for scientists, policy-makers, and managers to incorporate psychosocial evidence along with social science about fisher behavior into their models, policy processes, and management approaches. Doing so is likely to support efforts to anticipate impacts from behavioral change on capacity and capitalization in fleets and fisheries, and ultimately, lead to improved governance outcomes.

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Meet Dr. María Andrée López Gómez, our OFI Module I Researcher of the Month!

Fri Mar 26 2021 02:30:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

Dr. María Andrée López Gómez is a post-doctoral fellow with OFI Module I who likes to combine her background in Public Health (MPH), Sociology and Demography (MA) and Occupational Health (PhD) to study how policies impact work and workers. Her current research focuses on identifying which factors and dynamics are involved in recruitment, training and retention of people in small-scale fisheries in Newfoundland. Maria explains that "understanding the paths that people take to enter fisheries work and the obstacles they encounter as well as any facilitators is important to develop policies that enable recruitment and sustainable retention in small-scale fisheries." She hopes that the work she does in Module I-2 along with Dr. Nicole Power brings more understanding about the intended and unintended consequences that policies have on coastal livelihoods.

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Fish Harvesters' Knowledge & Science: Research in OFI Module I-B

Thu Mar 25 2021 02:30:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

According to Dr. Erin Carruthers and Dr. Barbara Neis, "for multispecies, owner-operator enterprises on our coasts, understanding the temporal and spatial distribution of this [American place, also known as deep-water flounder] and other fish species, is key to designing access and allocation processes appropriate for sustainable future inshore fisheries. Utilizing fishers' knowledge in the historical reconstruction is one crucial tool for this kind of initiative." For this reason, as part of OFI Module I-B on 'Fish Harvesters' Knowledge & Science', funded jointly by Module I, InnovateNL and the FFAW, Erin Carruthers and Ian Ivany at the FFAW are collaborating with Module I researcher Barb Neis to conduct groundfish harvester interviews and use DFO landings data to help assess how flounder contributed to the socioeconomic wellbeing of multispecies enterprises and to Newfoundland’s fishing communities prior to the closure of the fishery in the 1990s.

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Welcome Lilian Saul, our newest OFI Module I Master's student!

Wed Mar 24 2021 02:30:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

Our newest OFI Module I Master's student brings in a background in commercial fisheries, having worked as a deckhand in Maine lobstering for six years, and planning her second fishing season as a deckhand in Bristol Bay Alaska this summer. She began her Masters of Arts at Memorial University in the Fall of 2020 in the Geography Department under supervision of Dr. Ratana Chuenpagdee. Her research interests include studying governance in Newfoundland fisheries and the interaction between law and policy and coastal fishing communities. So far, she has discovered that "governance solutions to present issues are complex and integrated and that research needs to look at the interactions between elements rather than only one component, as is the case in species-specific research. Research on fisheries governance needs to assess not just inputs and outputs of specific policies, or values and principles motivating those policies, but also the overall frameworks and institutions in which decisions are made and how the levels of those interact."

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'Unlocking Legal and Policy Frameworks for Small-Scale Fisheries in Canada'

Sat Mar 20 2021 02:30:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

OFI Module I's current and former team members Jack Daly, Dr. Evan Andrews, Dr. Christine Knott and Dr. Gerald Singh have contributed a chapter on Canada's policy and legal frameworks for small-scale fisheries as part of Too Big To Ignore's recently published e-book on 'Unlocking Policy Frameworks for Small-Scale Fisheries: Global Illustrations'. According to the authors, "the lack of formal recognition of small-scale fisheries in Canada and rather a focus on recreational, commercial and Indigenous fisheries in federal policy limit the potential implementation of a coherent policy framework such as, for example, the SSF Guidelines, which were opposed by Canada during their initial development."

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